News-in-Transition

14 December 2017

 - A CBS news article published in 2011 entitled “Social Media Is a Tool of the CIA. Seriously”  reveals the “unspoken truth” which the mainstream media including CBS have failed to address.

According to CBS, the CIA is  “using Facebook, Twitter, Google (GOOG) and other social media to spy on people.” The article published by CBS refutes the lies of the MSM (with the exception of CBS?). It confirms the insidious relationship between the CIA, the Search Engines,  Social Media and major advertising conglomerates:

“You don’t need to wear a tinfoil hat to believe that the CIA is using Facebook, Twitter, Google (GOOG) and other social media to spy on people. That’s because the CIA publishes a helpful list of press releases on all the social media ventures it sponsors, via its technology investment arm In-Q-Tel. … “

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8 December 2017

 - As privacy barriers have gradually been eroded online, it’s become harder and harder to keep control over what you’re revealing to the websites you visit when you open up a web browser. For many users now, revealing who you are is just an inevitable consequence of being on the web and using apps, but if you want to tighten the reins on where your data’s going, you do have some options.

Starting with data reported to sites by your browser, a plugin or extension is probably your best bet for stopping data from leaking out. Try NoScript Security Suite for Firefox or ScriptSafe for Chrome, which prevent active items on websites from running when you don’t want them too. Other good options include the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Privacy Badger, which blocks third-party tracking cookies while allowing useful, like those that record ones to continue operating, and Disconnect, which offers free add-ons that work in a similar way.

We also like Ghostery, a privacy extension available for Chrome, Firefox, Opera, and Microsoft Edge. Like Privacy Badger and Disconnect, it stops cross-site, third-party trackers from running, and you can actually see a list of trackers on each site and choose to block or allow them as needed.

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23 May 2017

 - EFF, along with Life Hacker and CNET, are encouraging Twitter users to customize their privacy settings now before the new changes are automatically enabled in June.

With the new policy, Twitter will be keeping logs for users’ web histories for 30 days instead of 10, a move that Jules Polonetsky, CEO of the Future of Privacy Forum, says expands the pool of people it can track and allows Twitter to make more comprehensive profiles of users.

Interestingly, this change will not apply to E.U. member countries because Europe’s restrictive privacy laws prohibit it.

Twitter also discontinued support for the Do Not Track browser option, which previously allowed users to protect against targeted advertising.

Whether for privacy or profit, the changes are coming. Fortunately, it’s up to users to change their settings and decide how much they want to share.

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31 March 2017

- Get ready to explore your lawmakers' checkered search histories.

Republicans in Congress voted this week to gut a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) privacy rule that would sell everyone out to Internet Service Providers (ISP). The push will give ISPs the right to sell customer data to marketers, insert ads in your traffic, and insert tracking cookies in HTTP traffic that can’t be deleted or traced.

Repealing the FCC guidelines is a huge blow to online privacy. So Adam McElhaney, an activist based in Chattanooga, Tennessee who cares about privacy and net neutrality set up a GoFundMe page to collect donations to buy the internet histories of everyone who voted to repeal the FCC’s privacy protections.

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13 September 2016

facebook-israel-990x556 - Last week, a major censorship controversy erupted when Facebook began deleting all posts containing the iconic photograph of the Vietnamese “Napalm Girl” on the ground that it violated the company’s ban on “child nudity.” Facebook even deleted a post from the prime minister of Norway, who posted the photograph in protest of the censorship. As outrage spread, Facebook ultimately reversed itself — acknowledging “the history and global importance of this image in documenting a particular moment in time” — but this episode illustrated many of the dangers I’ve previously highlighted in having private tech companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google become the arbiters of what we can and cannot see.

Having just resolved that censorship effort, Facebook seems to be vigorously courting another. The Associated Press reports today from Jerusalem that “the Israeli government and Facebook have agreed to work together to determine how to tackle incitement on the social media network.” These meetings are taking place “as the government pushes ahead with legislative steps meant to force social networks to rein in content that Israel says incites violence.” In other words, Israel is about to legislatively force Facebook to censor content deemed by Israeli officials to be improper, and Facebook appears eager to appease those threats by working directly with the Israeli government to determine what content should be censored.

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Calendar of Events

Our next three group distant healing events:

21 December 2017 - Solstice

20 March 2018 - Equinox

21 June - Solstice

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