News-in-Transition

13 October 2017

epigenetics - Researchers have discovered that environmental genetic changes (epigenetics) can be passed down for an incredible 14 generations in an animal – the largest span ever observed in a living organism.

Numerous studies allege to show examples of epigenetic genes in humans showing all types of effects. Biologists have long suspected that some kind of epigenetic inheritance occurs at the cellular level.

Studies have shown that both the children and grandchildren of women who survived the Dutch famine of 1944-45 were found to have increased glucose intolerance when they were older. Other researchers have found that descendants of Holocaust survivors had lower levels of the hormone cortisol, which helps your body recover from a traumatic experience.

Another study by the North Carolina State University and the University of Tennessee found that a “poorly trained” immune system could be inherited as well as past trauma and even nutritional deficiencies. These results were discovered after the examination of the skulls of the Cherokee Native Americans who were descendants of those who survived the Trail of Tears...

Read more...

12 October 2017

8 glasses of water - What if water, plain and simple, was the most critically lacking substance for energy and health promotion in the modern lifestyle?

Some years ago, I read the late Dr. Fereydoon Batmanghelidj's marvelous book, Your Body's Many Cries for Water, first published in 1992 and more recently updated in 2008. Here this Iranian-American physician made and makes a strong case that chronic low grade and usually unrecognized dehydration affects most of us in the West, attuned as we are to avoiding water as a beverage and too often choosing dehydrating caffeinated and sweetened drinks that only contribute to the problem. After all, caffeine is a well-known diuretic, as is sugar.

After reading this book and the several that followed, I began to suspect that many of my patients, often diagnosed with life threatening malignancies and other serious degenerative diseases, appeared to be chronically dehydrated, though virtually none expressed any sensation of thirst. For many years I have routinely recommended my patients drink a minimum of 6-8 glasses of water a day in addition to whatever other liquids they might ingest such as the recommended vegetable juices. More recently, after giving greater thought to the subject, I have been recommending now 8-10 glasses a day, along with one half teaspoon of good quality sea salt, such as Himalayan or Celtic Sea Salt.  And, I have been surprised by the unexpected results. 

Read more...

3 October 2017

 - “In every culture and in every medical tradition before ours, healing was accomplished by moving energy.” – Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Biochemist and Nobel Prize Winner.

For centuries the ancient wisdom keepers and healers in several traditions had a keen understanding of the energetic body. The healing traditions from China, India, Japan and Tibet, as well as other countries all spoke of energy channels, meridians or nadis along which the vital energy flowed.

Life was considered to be a bio-electrical and vibrational energy phenomenon and so health revolved around balancing energy through various means. Life existed because of life force and energy running through and animating the body, ensuring we can move, breathe, digest food, think and even feel.

Read more...

26 September 2017

 - In a report that shocked no one familiar with the European medical establishment, a Europe-wide umbrella organization representing 29 national and international scientific academies in Europe, the European Academies Science Advisory Council has launched into a tirade against homeopathy.

The EASAC bashed homeopathy as non-sense and claimed that “promotion and use of homeopathic products, risks significant harms.”

The EASAC wrote the report with the intention of influencing policy and regulations across the European Union and encouraged scientists to “reinforce criticisms” of homeopathy as part of a unified front to stop the growing interest in the alternative health industry.

Read more...

24 September 2017

 - At the center of our bodies resides a long, wiry nerve called the vagus nerve. It extends all the way from the brain down through the chest and beyond the stomach. In addition, it connects to all major organs, including ears, eyes, tongue, kidneys, bladder, reproductive organs, and the colon. Scientists believe that vagus nerve stimulation can affect anxiety and depression, blood pressure and heart rate, as well as the function of digestive organs including the stomach, pancreas and the gall bladder.

Being the largest nerve in the body, the vagus nerve affects more than just the body’s physical functions. Some research indicates that a healthy vagus nerve is important to social bonding and empathy, as well as our ability to make complex decisions. Mystics believe that it is also the intersection between our conscious and unconscious minds, the physical and the subtle bodies. Therefore, the vagus nerve may be the most relevant part of our physical body that relates to our peace of mind and happiness.

Clearly, the vagus nerve plays a critical role in our bodies, hence it is also vital to our well-being. People with impaired vagal activity can suffer from depression, panic disorders, anxiety, mood swings and chronic fatigue. Physically, vagal imbalance can result in irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, heartburn, unhealthy heart rate, and chronic inflammation.

Read more...

29 August 2017

 - Have you ever been told when you’re stressed to stop worrying and just relax? That it’s all in your head? It would be nice if it were that simple. But it’s not.

Physiology research shows that the stress response memory lives in your nervous system. Take for example exposure to a stressful event. One in which you felt helpless, hopeless, and lacked control. In this case your autonomic nervous system (ANS) is engaged. This is the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling unconscious bodily actions like breathing. To be more specific, it was the sympathetic branch (fight or flight) of the ANS that kicked in while you were strained. In addition, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the midbrain began firing. In which a signal from your hypothalamus sends a hormonal message to your pituitary gland that stimulates to your adrenal glands.

To activate this fight or flight response, stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline are released from your adrenal glands. They help our body suddenly mobilize to flee danger. According to Peter A. Levine, trauma expert in the field of psychotherapy, trauma occurs when this biological process is overwhelmed and a person is unable to release and process the stressful event. It is possible to avoid a traumatic response by discharging the energy generated. For example, shaking, crying, and screaming can allow the individual to physically process the stress.

Read more...

25 August 2017

Brain Regeneration: Why It's Real & How To Do It - Have you ever wished you could regenerate those brain cells you sacrificed in college? Do you fear that your aging brain is in a perpetual state of decline? Medical science is being rewritten to show that we CAN improve the health of our brain, and that repairing damage is not only possible, it’s something anyone can do.

It is a commonly held misconception that the brain is beyond repair. Even the medical establishment has asserted that once we kill brain cells, they are gone forever. The fact is, the brain can repair itself, and as science is now proving, there is real benefit to simple practices that can help keep our brains sharp and elastic throughout our lifetime.

The field of cognitive neuroscience is relatively new - only around one hundred years old - so it’s no surprise that we are constantly arriving at a newer and better understanding of how the neural circuitry of the human brain supports overall brain functioning.

For most of those one hundred years, it was believed that once damaged, the brain could not regenerate. Brain cells were finite, and any loss or injury would be suffered as a deficiency for the rest of that person’s life. This created a false belief that the brain is essentially in a perpetual state of decline.

Read more...

22 August 2017

 - Did you know your body has an endocannabinoid system? A year ago I didn’t either.

I’m no doctor, but I thought I was familiar with the key biological systems in the body. Turns out though, I was wrong. That’s because unless you’re a research scientist or work in the field of medical cannabis, it’s unlikely you’ll ever have been told about the endocannabinoid system. And yet, it has been hailed as “the most important physiologic system involved in establishing and maintaining human health.”
Why do so few people know about the endocannabinoid system?

So what’s the big mystery? Well, it might have something to do with how the endocannabinoid system (ECS) was discovered. Back in the 1990s scientists were trying to understand how THC, the psychoactive substance in the cannabis plant, elicits its effect on the body. What they uncovered was a complex network of receptors (CB1) in the brain and central nervous system that were a perfect fit for the THC molecule.

Read more...

16 August 2017

 - As Millennials age and replace the Baby Boomers as the food industry’s main consumers, a new American diet that rejects processed foods is becoming increasingly popular and shifting the current supply chain.

At present, only 15 percent of U.S. farmable land is devoted to growing the fruits, legumes, and greens that this generation is hungry for, causing their cravings to be satiated by pricey imports. The lack of domestic production on a sufficient scale has inspired many Millennials to grow food for themselves, as it mitigates the food miles, expense, and lack of equitable food access that a reliance on imports creates.

In result, the National Gardening Association (NGA) reported that the number of Millennial households growing their own food increased 63 percent from 2008 to 2013. It is unlikely that this statistic has greatly decreased; a 2016 NGA survey reported five out of the six million Americans that took up gardening last year were Millennials. Even space-limited city dwellers have joined in, and it is not uncommon to find folks of this generation with apartment apiaries, rooftop gardens, or aquaponic systems.

Read more...

8 August 2017

Image: Science bombshell as new research confirms non-genetic inheritance factors are carried through multiple generations -

It was already known that epigenetic mechanisms that are modulated by environmental cues like disease, lifestyle and diet can switch genes on and off, but there has been a great deal of debate about whether these modifications can be passed along to future generations.

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics now have the answer to this question. They have shown that it’s not just inherited DNA that regulates gene expression in human offspring; it’s also inherited epigenetic instructions.

In addition, scientists have shed light on the biological consequences of this inherited information, proving that a mother’s epigenetic memory plays a vital role in her offspring’s development and survival.

Read more...

27 July 2017

 - The U.K.’s National Health Service (NHS) has announced that it will ban homeopathy and herbal medicine in order to save £250 million ($325 million) a year, calling the healing methods a “misuse of scarce funds.” They are among dozens of medicines which officials said should not be funded by the health service. [1]

NHS has spent hundreds of thousands of pounds on homeopathic treatment, which it now says “is a placebo” and a waste of money that could be spent on “treatments that work.”

Health officials said the products on the list were “relatively ineffective, unnecessary, inappropriate, or unsafe for prescription on the NHS.”

Moving forward, patients will be told to pay for their own treatment for dozens of common ailments, ranging from indigestion to athlete’s foot. No more homeopathic products like cough and cold treatments, eye drops, or laxatives will be covered by the service.

Additionally, the Department of Health is mulling cutting back spending on gluten-free products.

Read more...

30 June 2017

 - Age is a peculiar concept. We tend to think of it as the number of birthdays we have celebrated -- our chronological age. But this is just one indicator of the passage of time. We also have a biological age, a measure of how quickly the cells in our body are deteriorating compared with the general population. And these two figures don't always match up.

Just take a look around: we all know people who look young for their age, or folks who seem prematurely wizened. Even in an individual, different parts of the body can age at different speeds. By examining how chronological age lines up with biological age across the population, researchers are starting to pin down how these two measures should sync up -- and what it means for how long we have left when they don't.

In recent years, studies have shown that our biological age is often a more reliable indicator of future health than our actual age. It could help us identify or even prevent disease by tracking the pace at which we're getting older. It may even allow us to slow -- or reverse -- the aging process.

Read more...

26 June 2017

 - Studies of human populations suggest that our health and longevity could be affected by the diets and experiences of our grandparents. For example, studies of a small community in northern Sweden where detailed historical records were kept found correlations between food availability for one generation and the mortality rate for that generation's grandchildren.

But the exact nature of these effects and how they are transmitted across generations remain unclear. In Susan Strome's lab at UC Santa Cruz, research on a tiny roundworm called C. elegans is helping to solve this puzzle.

A key question has been whether such changes can be passed across generations. The idea that epigenetic modifications can cause changes in gene expression that are transmitted from one generation to the next is known as "transgenerational epigenetic inheritance." It is a revolutionary concept that remains somewhat controversial despite mounting evidence to back it up.

Read more...

Calendar of Events

Our next three group distant healing events:

21 December 2017 - Solstice

20 March 2018 - Equinox

21 June - Solstice

Boycott Israeli Goods