News-in-Transition

11 November 2017

 - We are innately born with the potential of a creative genius, but the moment we enter the school system, we get dramatically dumbed down. The reasoning for this is not too difficult to apprehend; school, as we plainly call it, is an institution that has historically been put in place to ultimately serve the needs wants of the ruling class, not the common people. Whether it be ancient Sparta, Germanic Prussia, or the more modern industrial American system, education has always served as a “lawful” means of mass indoctrination.

If you would like to learn more about this history of deliberate manipulation, I highly recommend reading award winning teacher, John Taylor Gatto’s book The Underground History of American Education, which traces the genesis of modern day compulsory schooling and clearly demonstrates how it has always been used against us.

You see, children pose the greatest threat of all to this corrupt system. Their “wild imaginations” are so intense and remarkable, that if left unchecked would result in a creative revolution that will ultimately compromise the ruling class’s proverbial game of monopoly. In order for the so called elite to maintain their lavish life style’s of overt luxury — where they contribute the least but enjoy the most — they understand that children must be dumbed down and brainwashed to accept (and even serve) their rapacious system of artificial scarcity, unending exploitation, and incessant war.

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19 October 2017

Children are pictured using gardening tools to create more play space at the nursery, where 15 hours of care is provided for free each week, with subsidised fees for any extra time

 - An outdoor pre-school where children are kept outside in all weathers and are only allowed to play with toys they made themselves has been named Britain's Best Nursery.

No matter the weather, children play and learn outdoors at the innovative and unique Dandelion Education Nursery.

It was set up by former primary school teachers Hayley Room and Emma Harwood who left the classroom to bring children back to their roots.

Ms Room, 44, said: 'There are no plastic toys here at Dandelion. The only toys that you see here are made by the children themselves.

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16 October 2017

 - Here’s an experiment to try next time you meet a baby, try holding a normal conversation. It is very difficult, isn’t it? Yes it is! Oh, yes it is!

When we talk to babies we all naturally switch into a high energy, sing song tone. We use simple words and short sentences. We sound excited. Our pitch rises at the end of the sentence. These particular characteristics of “parentese” or infant-directed speech (IDS) seem to be common across many languages.

A new study, published in Current Biology, has suggested there are universal changes in vocal timbre when talking to babies. Timbre describes the quality of a voice or a musical instrument. The difference between a violin and a trumpet playing the same note is a difference in timbre.

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11 October 2017

 - Our current compulsory schooling model was created at the dawn of the Industrial Age. As factories replaced farm work and production moved swiftly outside of homes and into the larger marketplace, 19th century American schooling mirrored the factories that most students would ultimately join.

The bells and buzzers signaling when students could come and go, the tedium of the work, the straight lines and emphasis on conformity and compliance, the rows of young people sitting passively at desks while obeying their teachers, the teachers obeying the principal, and so on—all of this was designed for factory-style efficiency and order.

The trouble is that we have left the Industrial Era for the Imagination Age, but our mass education system remains fully entrenched in factory-style schooling. By many accounts, mass schooling has become even more restrictive than it was a century ago, consuming more of childhood and adolescence than at any time in our history. The first compulsory schooling statute, passed in Massachusetts in 1852, required eight to 14-year-olds to attend school a mere 12 weeks a year, six of which were to be consecutive. This seems almost laughable compared to the childhood behemoth that mass schooling has now become.

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4 September 2017

Children's printed book sales are soaring as youngsters turn their backs on online reading due to 'screen fatigue' (file photo)

 - Children's printed book sales are soaring as youngsters turn their backs on online reading due to 'screen fatigue'.

Sales of children's titles rose by 16 per cent last year with sales totalling £365million, as popular authors like David Walliams inspire young readers to pick up a book.

But while printed sales increase, e-books are on the wane with a 3 per cent fall in sales.

Figures show that almost £1 in every £4 spent on printed books is from a children's title, reports the Observer.

Children's authors are proving to be a key genre in the publishing industry, often outselling others.

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27 August 2017

 - Who is Sir Ken Robinson? He’s a prominent scholar who works with education systems, international agencies, and several global corporations, as well as some of the world’s leading cultural organizations, to spark the energy of individuals and organizations. In fact, Sir Ken Robinson is the most watched speaker in his field; his talk “Changing Education Paradigms,” featured below, has been viewed online over 40 million times and seen by approximately 350 million people in 160 countries. Clearly, there are a lot of people who deeply resonate with his message.

In that video linked above, Robinson shows how we are working with an old education model that is not keeping up to new ideas, and new information that’s constantly emerging. This is a good point because, especially in today’s day and age, new information is always challenging long held belief systems. It a great tool to spark critical thinking, discussion and questioning.

Prior to his work, he was a professor of arts education at the University of Warwick in the UK, where he is now professor emeritus. Almost two decades ago, he led a national commission on creativity, education, and the economy for the UK government. He has been a catalyst for unlocking the creativity of money, and helping others pursue one of the only things they should pursue: their passion.

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15 August 2017

 - The anti-homework trend is growing. It started with the teacher from Texas who banned homework from her second grade class, encouraging families to spend time reading, playing, and eating together instead.

It spread to a New Jersey elementary school, where the principal and his teaching staff voted to be homework free for the 2016-2017 school year.

And now, according to Valerie Strauss in The Washington Post, homework is headed for the dumpster bin in an entire school district:

“Elementary school students in one Florida school district are going to find a welcome new — but controversial — policy when they return to school for the 2017-2018 school year next month: no traditional homework.

They are being asked to do one thing to help them academically: Read for 20 minutes a night.

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14 August 2017

 - Few middle schoolers are as clued in to their mathematical strengths and weakness as Moheeb Kaied. Now a seventh grader at Brooklyn’s Middle School 442, he can easily rattle off his computational profile.

“Let’s see,” he said one morning this spring. “I can find the area and perimeter of a polygon. I can solve mathematical and real-world problems using a coordinate plane. I still need to get better at dividing multiple-digit numbers, which means I should probably practice that more.”

Moheeb is part of a new program that is challenging the way teachers and students think about academic accomplishments, and his school is one of hundreds that have done away with traditional letter grades inside their classrooms. At M.S. 442, students are encouraged to focus instead on mastering a set of grade-level skills, like writing a scientific hypothesis or identifying themes in a story, moving to the next set of skills when they have demonstrated that they are ready. In these schools, there is no such thing as a C or a D for a lazily written term paper. There is no failing. The only goal is to learn the material, sooner or later.

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22 July 2017

 - Compelling research shows that when children are allowed to learn naturally, without top-down instruction and coercion, the learning is deeper and much more creative than when children are passively taught. University of California at Berkeley professor Alison Gopnik finds in her studies with four-year-olds, as well as similar studies out of MIT, that self-directed learning – not forced instruction – elevates both learning outcomes and creativity.

Gopnik’s research involved young children learning how to manipulate a specific toy that would make certain sounds or exhibit certain features in certain sequences. She found that when children were directly taught how to use the toy they were able to replicate the results and quickly get to the “right answer” on their own by loosely mimicking what the teacher demonstrated.

But when the children were instead allowed to learn without direct instruction – to play with the toy, explore its features, and discover its capabilities on their own – they were able to get to the “right answer” in fewer steps than the taught children. The self-directed children also revealed other parts of the toy that could do interesting things – which the taught children did not discover.

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2 July 2017

 - As parents during this intense and exciting time on Earth, we accepted and/or chose an extremely important job. We are guiding the next caretakers of the Earth and evolution of humanity.

Our children are growing up in a world where they are faced with challenges unlike those we have ever seen. The world is literally at their fingertips, and although this has great opportunity when applied correctly, it also brings constant distraction and stimulation, therefore pulling them away from connecting with Nature and looking inward and knowing who they are.

Not only this, but with climate change, a contaminated food chain, toxic water, questionable vaccines and out dated school programs, it has never been more important for us as parents to be “awake.”

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2 June 2017

 - Are children scheduled to the max these days? Are there any waking moments that give children the freedom to express themselves in unstructured environments? Children should be allowed to get bored so they can develop their innate ability to be creative, an education expert says.

Deschoolers maintain that a child's learning should be curiosity-driven rather than dictated by teachers and textbooks, and that forcing kids to adhere to curricula quashes their natural inclination to explore and ask questions because childrne think differently.

Dr Teresa Belton says cultural expectations that children should be constantly active could hamper the development of their imagination.

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11 May 2017

 - Those coming of age today will face some of the greatest obstacles ever encountered by young people.

They will find themselves overtaxed, burdened with excessive college debt, and struggling to find worthwhile employment in a debt-ridden economy on the brink of implosion. Their privacy will be eviscerated by the surveillance state. They will be the subjects of a military empire constantly waging war against shadowy enemies and government agents armed to the teeth ready and able to lock down the country at a moment’s notice.

As such, they will find themselves forced to march in lockstep with a government that no longer exists to serve the people but which demands they be obedient slaves or suffer the consequences.

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12 March 2017

 - Late last summer, Texas teacher Brandy Young made internet waves when she sent a note about homework to the parents of her students.

Instead of the normal spend-30-minutes-a-day-on-homework command that parents normally hear, Mrs. Young’s note informed them that she would not be giving homework at all. Instead, she asked families to spend more time reading, eating dinner, and playing outside, all factors which research has found to contribute to greater student success.

But Mrs. Young was not the only educator to get on the no homework bandwagon. An entire elementary school in Vermont did the same. And according to The Washington Post, that decision seems to be turning out just fine for the students, parents, and teachers of Orchard School:

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Calendar of Events

Our next three group distant healing events:

21 December 2017 - Solstice

20 March 2018 - Equinox

21 June - Solstice

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